Braving the Black Sea

2009-02-13

Re–blog from Soundscaping.

A review of Christian Fennesz’s album Black Sea, released 2008 on Touch, writter by Trym Asserson.

This was probably my favorite album of last year. I keep coming back to the highly textural piece Lullaby, it’s beautiful. I had the pleasure of attending Art’s Birthday earlier this year where Fennesz played it live. What a marvelous experience that was!

If you haven’t already, be sure to check it out. I assure you, it’s time well invested.

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My Life in Art: How Jean-Michel Basquiat Taught Me to Forget About Technique

2009-02-12

Re–blog from the Guardian.

A personally written introduction to Jean–Michel Basquiat’s life and art by Will Gompertz. As mentioned earlier Basquiat’s has had a big impact in my life. For us art interested DIY-kids of Generation Y he surly is the Master.


Welcome to the Everything Emulator

2009-02-12

Re–blog from the Guardian.

I’ve posted about digital preservation earlier. In this article Bobbie Johnson mention two projects, one American and one European. I wish them all the luck creating the simulator of simulators and promise to keep you updated on the projects.


The State Should Fund Graffiti Artists

2009-02-12

Re–blog from the Guardian.

Nothing to add. Mr. Jones is spot on: Give them [the young unemployed] a spray can (and access to free art education) and you just might produce the next Jackson Pollock. The first artist to pop up into my mind is Basquiat, who’s art has had an large impact on my life.


Charlie Koolhaas: True Cities

2009-02-12

Re–blog from VernissageTV.

The exhibition True Cities, by Dutch artist and sociologist Charlie Koolhaas at Architekturforum Aedes in Berlin, try to bring the World into one place. The concept is to show how connected the Globe is using photos from the four cities of Guangzhou, Dubai, Lagos, and London.

I find this naive view on photography’s mimetic qualities problematic. Of course Koolhaas herself is aware of this and states that as soon as you make collections they start to form communities of their own. So in a sense this art work is self-fulfilled.

The idea that each city is identified by it’s density or emptyness of space grabbed my attention. This definition by negation of space is worth contemplating. Could the same statement be made for the human mind?


Bottling Miraculous Creativity

2009-02-12

Re–blog from the Morning News.

Watch this beautiful video of Elizabeth Gilbert’s lecture held at TED. Here she questions the western cultures egocentric view on the creative spirit. Her anxiety drove her way back into history and the ancient view of the genius.

I often talk about the Roman Genius with friends. Few know about it but everyone appreciate it. It seems many creative people find comfort in of these type of myths and I gladly promote them.

I first read about it in the Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben’s collection of essays Profanazioni. It’s a really good book and I really recommend it.

And I really recommend any creative person to take a closer look on the ancient view about the Genius. I’m sure it will help you through some rough times.


Why Men Can’t Handle Money (Part I)

2009-02-12

Re–blog from the Chronicle.

Here’s just my personal experience. Many women actually seek out this adventurous boys to nurture and foster. I can’t say I have the whole picture even though I can think of many probable reasons. To be honest I’ve kind of taken advantaged of it. I never met or dated so many good looking bright women as when I gambled the most. Not to mention that I often met them in the company of dangerous men…


The Ancient Marble Statue is a White Lie

2009-02-12

Re–blog from SvD.

Article written in Swedish and published by the Swedish morning newspaper Svenska Dagbladet — The Swedish Daily Paper. Sadly it isn’t possible to translate it via Google Translate.

The main proposition, and according to the author — a Professor of Ancient Culture and Society — known by scientists for centuries, is that ancient marble statues were painted in bright colors! I was totally unaware of this.

Also mentioned in the article is the use of digital technology to simulate the colors originally used by projecting them unto the statues. Very creative and inspiring!


Enlightenment, Porn, and Worse: Studying Human Cruelty

2009-02-12

Re–blog from the OUPblog.

I totally agree: we are in great need to understand human cruelty. The media landscape and the availability of, in lack of a better word, negative news has changed our perception of violence, war, etc. I often speak about our — that being the global — culture as pornographic. It all reminds me of Susan Sontag’s Regarding the Pain of Others.


Smoke Screens

2009-02-12

Re–blog from AIGA.

It’s a good article with some interesting thoughts. But I advise everyone, including Angela Riechers, that feel anxiety about how technology is changing our perception and way of living to read up on the worlds leading urban theorist Manuel Castells’ research. Most of us aren’t using technology the way Angela thinks — or even worse, do her self.