Archive for the 'media' Category

Welcome to the Everything Emulator

2009-02-12

Re–blog from the Guardian.

I’ve posted about digital preservation earlier. In this article Bobbie Johnson mention two projects, one American and one European. I wish them all the luck creating the simulator of simulators and promise to keep you updated on the projects.

Enlightenment, Porn, and Worse: Studying Human Cruelty

2009-02-12

Re–blog from the OUPblog.

I totally agree: we are in great need to understand human cruelty. The media landscape and the availability of, in lack of a better word, negative news has changed our perception of violence, war, etc. I often speak about our — that being the global — culture as pornographic. It all reminds me of Susan Sontag’s Regarding the Pain of Others.

Nam June Paik: Lessons From the Video Master

2009-02-10

Yesterday UBUWEB published an excerpt from Skip Blumberg’s documentary Nam June Paik: Lessons From the Video Master. Shot in 2006 at Nam June’s funeral Skip asks people, among them several well known media artists, what they learned from Nam June. My favorite interview is with Japanese artist — as a glitch kid I adore his sound art — Yasunao Tone. Apparently the Master thought him spying techniques!

Drawing Board to the Desktop: A Designer’s Path

2009-02-09

Re–blog from NY Times.

A fun, personal and informative piece by Michael Bierut about his road into the design business and the changes computer use brought to it. And Michael, being sentimental isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Also remember that we, the younger generation, someday in the not so far away future will be the ones with sentimental feelings. How will we cope with them If no one teach us to accept and handle them? I’m glad you did and shared this with us, and in such a fun way.

Glitches Adding Authenticity

2009-02-09

Re–blog from c.oncio.us/ly.

Glitch art is a big interest of mine. I’ve done a lot of glitch art myself — both visual and audio — that I will be present to you as soon as I get the money to fund the Web gallery project.

This was posted on Iman Moradi’s blog, one of the authorities on visual glitch art. What grabbed me wasn’t the post but the title: That glitches add authenticity. I’ve never thought about it but of course it can! Mind though that it’s a dangers business, as the case with the fake photo of North Korean dictator Kim Jong-il shows.

Why Television Still Shines in a World of Screens

2009-02-08

Re–blog from NY Times.

Randall Stross finds his idea that people prefer screen–based media over print–based media because it’s passive speculative. It’s not the first time I’ve heard that one, so in my world it’s more kind of the old, classic argument. And frankly I’ve never read one scientific paper that backs it up. So here’s a more speculative hypothesis for you.

People prefer screen–based media over print–based media because it’s more active. But how could that be? One must realize that human beings are embodied. And we have the ability to understand that others feel, think and act and why they do it. This is in large part what defines us. And of course our ability to do this increases with animation.

These are well known facts in the scientific community and it has tons of research to back it up. The Theory of Mind plays a large role in developmental psychology and theories of embodiment has been around since the 1940’s. It’s a shame that authorities like Mr. Stross isn’t aware of this.

It would make me happy and the world a better place if the type of pseudo–scientific fact like reading being more active then watching would stop flourish in the popular media. And hopefully the acknowledgment of Theory of Mind and embodiment can help the print–based media companies to come up with more productive solutions to their problems then the ones now being implemented.

You find more information about the Theory of Mind on Wikipedia and these two videos with well known American philosopher Hubert Dreyfus is a good introduction to embodiment.