Posts Tagged ‘history’

My Life in Art: How Jean-Michel Basquiat Taught Me to Forget About Technique

2009-02-12

Re–blog from the Guardian.

A personally written introduction to Jean–Michel Basquiat’s life and art by Will Gompertz. As mentioned earlier Basquiat’s has had a big impact in my life. For us art interested DIY-kids of Generation Y he surly is the Master.

Welcome to the Everything Emulator

2009-02-12

Re–blog from the Guardian.

I’ve posted about digital preservation earlier. In this article Bobbie Johnson mention two projects, one American and one European. I wish them all the luck creating the simulator of simulators and promise to keep you updated on the projects.

The Ancient Marble Statue is a White Lie

2009-02-12

Re–blog from SvD.

Article written in Swedish and published by the Swedish morning newspaper Svenska Dagbladet — The Swedish Daily Paper. Sadly it isn’t possible to translate it via Google Translate.

The main proposition, and according to the author — a Professor of Ancient Culture and Society — known by scientists for centuries, is that ancient marble statues were painted in bright colors! I was totally unaware of this.

Also mentioned in the article is the use of digital technology to simulate the colors originally used by projecting them unto the statues. Very creative and inspiring!

The Many Faces of Pablo Picasso

2009-02-09

Re–blog from the Guardian.

A very well written article by Peter Conrad on Picasso. It’s quite long but well worth the read. Whenever I read about Picasso I come to think about the French philosopher Michel Serres’ book the Parasite. The parastitic as metaphysics, as a necessity of human existence.

Collection Catalogue 2.0 & What is a Museum (Now) Anyway?

2009-02-09

Re–blog from Smarthistory.

I’ve been following this discussion in the media and I beg for this to happen. Even for me, as an art interested non-scholar, this would be a great resource, to get more educated on and acquainted with art and art theory. And living in Sweden – on the other side of the world from where this museums are located – the probability that will be able to visit them all and view their collections is minimal. This way I can become at least a bit more familiar with it.

The Frightening Beauty of Bunkers

2009-02-09

Re–blog from the Morning News.

The English translation of well known French critic and urbanist Paul Virilio’s Bunker Archeology, originally published in French 1975, was published earlier this year by Princeton Architectural Press. Here you find an excerpt from the preface, introduced by Rosecrans Baldwin and published together with some of Virilio’s photos.